#wetoo: The Power Of “We” Will Set Us Free

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In response to the scepticism surrounding the #metoo posts blossoming up on our social feeds, let me explain to you why it’s powerful and important, because my head is filling up with a lot of loud pointy red shapes that look something like fury, if fury were a number of very sharp arrows. I don’t know if those arrows will hit their mark but hey, better out than in.

To be clear, I encourage questioning. I understand the scepticism surrounding any social media-based movement bandwagon that everyone hops on, because for the most part they’re hugely ineffectual. They’re a great way to publicly display that you care about a sociopolitical issue, without actually doing anything about it. They can encourage continued complacency in the guise of participation.

This one is different. It isn’t just about effecting change; it’s also about voice, camaraderie, public solidarity, and awareness.

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Like Riding A Bike

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I never learnt how to ride a bike as a child. The older I became, the more the two-wheeled enigma became an impenetrable fantasy mode of transport, and the more estranged I felt from “normal” people who took this skill for granted. But my god, the rush when I managed to peddle for the first time! I screamed inwardly, “I’m a cute girl in an A-line smock riding a bicycle in Berlin!” and, with the stupidest grin plastered across my face, cycled for about three metres – before crashing into the side of a stationary car.

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A. Swayze and the Ghosts

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It’s a soggy Tuesday morning in Hobart, and the talented boys from garage rock/punk band A. Swayze and the Ghosts have just flown home after launching their single, ‘Reciprocation’, at the Grace Darling in Melbourne. The high energy band – comprised of Andrew (Swayze) Hasler and very solid, non-spooky ghosts Zac Blain, Hendrik Wipprecht and Ben Simms – chatted with us over some very civilised pints with mostly civilised banter about their music, history, inspirations and aspirations.

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Schmørgåsbaag

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Think of Schmørgåsbaag as Harry Potter’s Room of Requirement, but for Hobartians in need of a place to host, hold, hang or make things. Luuk Wipprecht, the founder, coordinator and polymath behind Schmørgåsbaag, sheds light on the origin, aims and happenings of Murray Street’s pop-up space.

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Native Weddings

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Tye Dunn and Michael Bird form the dynamic duo behind Collingwood-based Native Weddings. With an emphasis on producing wedding videos that capture the genuine story, Tye and Michael strive to redefine a strain of videography usually associated with Vaseline lens shots. In an age where the notion of happily ever after is being redefined in itself, this is no small feat. We talk to them about filmmaking, love, and how they tell the modern tale of romance.

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Neoncubicle

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Melissa Hamlyn (Neoncubicle) is a visual artist who treats her studio like a laboratory. She works with digital pattern making, projection and textiles, using abstract motifs to produce conceptual mind maps of her travels and connections with people.

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Angry Girl: Gemma Flack

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There’s a sacred magic to a girl’s bedroom, and feminist illustrator/all-round babe Gemma Flack invokes it with ritualistic relish in her solo exhibition, Angry Girls Club. Housed upstairs in Collingwood’s Off The Kerb Gallery, Angry Girls Club is a series of portraits of rad defiant girls and women embodying feminine resilience and identity.

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Kinship & Co

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Melbourne is famous for alleyway cafés, but Kinship & Co is the only one I’ve encountered where the staff run a relentless onslaught of banter that rivals The Muppet Show, regulars are nicknamed after fictional serial killers, and the tongue-in-cheek pop music referencing jaffles make working in the soulless corporate side of the Melbourne CBD considerably more tolerable and exponentially more delicious.

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Bryn DC

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Walking into Bryn DC’s home feels akin to entering a room in Guillermo del Toro’s Bleak House. Bryn is an artist whose proclivity for the horror genre and darker mythologies has seen him develop as a photographer, sculptor, special effects artist and designer. He talks to us about his passion for filmmaking, how ignorance is more macabre than death, his latest work, and the importance of art.

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George Rose

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George Rose is an artist, illustrator and avid muralist whose reputation as a multidisciplinary creative precedes her. She has been a ubiquitous artistic force in Canberra for years. For a while I was convinced ‘George Rose’ was the name of some magical mythical creature leaving soul-sparking artwork in her wake, like the illustrator version of the Questing Beast. After having met her in person and seen her studio, this conviction hasn’t changed.

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