canberra

Jumpcuts

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Walking into the Phoenix Bar in Canberra on a Wednesday night, you might be surprised to find a room full of people paying rapt attention to a screen at the back of the stage normally reserved for musicians and performers, with a little theatrette in front. But on the first Wednesday of each month, something new and unique is happening: Jumpcuts, an open mic night for short film, run by local filmmakers Elise Dare and Dom Northcott, with hosts Ellie Windred and Nick Delatovic.

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Belinda Barnes

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Belinda Barnes is a Canberra-based Australian painter originally from South Africa. The moody colouring of her work evokes landscapes and natural shapes seen as memories, while her use of perspective gives a simultaneous feel of the aerial and the microscopic. There is a distinctly Australian quality about her work – the earthy orange and red palette, combined with striking blues, summon extremes of Australian bush and water. Belinda has had several exhibitions and sold numerous works, and took the time to talk to us about her artwork, her process and her story.

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Homer

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Homer is an online journal which creates conversations about masculinities and alternative male role models. The website was officially launched in September, and we spoke to founder and editor Ashley Thompson about how he’s feeling about things so far, the difficulties with creating a space that invites men to be vulnerable, and where he’d like to see Homer going in the future.

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Happy Axe

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Happy Axe is the solo project of Canberra based musician Emma Kelly, recently returned from a tour of Europe. Using violin, musical saw and vocals, combined with digital manipulation and looping, she creates ethereal soundscapes that bring enraptured audiences to a standstill. Each time she performs she is recreating the pieces anew, layering the sounds together live. We talk to her about the struggles of solo performance, her creative process, and some of her experiences performing overseas as well as on home soil.

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Bomb Collar

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In writer and performer Nick Delatovic’s own words, “If you come to see Bomb Collar, you’re going to see the last pop singer on earth give a pep rally concert to a revolutionary army. In real terms, it’s a sci-fi black comedy cabaret show built around eight original songs.”

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First Three Rows May Get Topless

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“When I was at uni, me and a few girlfriends came up with the idea to get naked, cover ourselves in glitter and yell about shit. We thought it was hilarious, but we didn’t know if it would fly and we hadn’t had much performing experience.” Five years later, Tony was the last of the group still in Canberra, but felt she now had the experience to make Glitoris happen. “It was right after Julia’s misogyny speech in Parliament,” she says. “It felt like this new wave of feminism was coming through. It was the right time.”

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George Rose

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George Rose is an artist, illustrator and avid muralist whose reputation as a multidisciplinary creative precedes her. She has been a ubiquitous artistic force in Canberra for years. For a while I was convinced ‘George Rose’ was the name of some magical mythical creature leaving soul-sparking artwork in her wake, like the illustrator version of the Questing Beast. After having met her in person and seen her studio, this conviction hasn’t changed.

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For best results, BYO microwave

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There is a quote, attributed to either a German politician or an American poet, that anyone wishing to keep their respect for laws and sausages should not see how either is made. Sausages aside, I’ve always thought that seeing the process of creation usually enhances the appreciation of just about everything else. Reuben Ingall, prolific Canberra musician and offbeat-sound enthusiast, feels the same way.

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Still a good score

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What’s it like at places where people go and stand before a crowd and have their writing publicly judged? The good news is that I wouldn’t describe the atmosphere at a poetry slam as fear-inducing. Raucous – yes. Rowdy – certainly. Structured by a loose handful of rules, each more puzzling than the last – definitely. But not really scary at all.

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Making a run for it

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The first time I left home, I was seven years old. I was so mad. I have no idea what I was mad at, but my god, it was shocking. I made a Vegemite sandwich, packed my favourite yellowed teddy bear in my Space Jam backpack, took one last wistful look at the rest of my toys, and I was gone.

I made it less than a block.

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